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Theory of Living Matter Group

 

Organizers

Édouard Hannezo

Postdoctoral Research associate

Department of Physics and Gurdon Institute

Email:

Research Interests

  • Epithelial mechanics and morphological transitions in three dimensions
  • Stem cell kinetics during development
  • Collective cell migration
  • Cortical instabilities in pattern formation

Edouard is trained as a theoretical biophysicist, and uses methods from soft matter, hydrodynamics and mechanics to study the morphogenesis of epithelial tissues, as well as cancer initiation, in collaboration with experimental biologists. He also likes to do a bit of experimental work from time to time!


Ben Steventon

Group Leader

Department of Genetics

Personal website
Email:
Publications: https://steventonlab.wordpress.com/publications/

Research Interests

  • Comparative developmental biology
  • Cell lineage analysis of neuromesodermal progenitors during vertebrate axis elongation
  • The role of gene expression heterogeneity in the maintenance of multipotency

Ben is an experimental biologist interested in the molecular and cellular processes that drive the elongation of the vertebrate body axis. His current work focusses on assessing the role of gene expression heterogeneity in the maintenance of a bipotent stem cell population termed 'neuromesodermal progenitors' that generate both neural and mesodermal progenitors as the body axis extends. He is particularly interested in how divergent cellular behaviours are generated by seemingly conserved signal and gene regulatory networks across a range of vertebrate species.



David Jörg

Postdoctoral Research Associate

Department of Physics and Gurdon Institute

Personal website
Email:
Publications: http://www.davidjorg.com/publications.php

Research Interests

  • Stem cell dynamics in tissue development, maintenance, and repair
  • Biochemical signaling and genetic oscillations
  • Embryonic pattern formation
  • Synchronisation in biology and engineering

Having a background in quantum many-particle theory, David became interested in the theoretical understanding of collective phenomena in living systems. His current main focus is on how the pool of stem cells that maintains adult tissue is regulated through biochemical signaling and how it recovers after injury. In addition, he works on embryonic pattern formation such as the segmentation of the vertebrate body axis and the development of the fly visual system. David is also involved in transferring the insights obtained in living systems to engineering concepts for technical applications.



Vikas Trivedi

Postdoctoral Fellow

Department of Genetics

Email:

Research Interests

  • Developmental biology
  • Computational modelling
  • Modern microscopy

Vikas joined the Department of Genetics as a Herchel Smith Fellow in 2016, coming from California Institute of Technology (Caltech, USA) where he did a PhD in Bioengineering. An engineer by training and with expertise in developmental biology, computational modeling and modern microscopy, he is interested in understanding the interplay of mechanical forces and chemical signaling that drive the beautiful self-assembly of cells to shape a developing embryo. He loves teaching and enjoys discussions across disciplines.